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Working with troubled youth and families has never been easy work. In these changing times with demands for new services, decreasing funding, evolving philosophies of care and the desire for new, different, or more effective methods, we need creative solutions. Effective training offers the opportunity to meet some of these challenges through helping individuals enhance their professional skills and knowledge. The information provided here describes training possibilities available to help workers, teams and organizations become more effective in providing a quality service for troubled youth and families. 

Although there are brief descriptions here, any training will be modified to meet the practice realities of the participants and the specific needs of the group, team or organization. The descriptions offered are therefore brief sketches of possible trainings.

The goals section of each training description suggests outcomes which might be reached through the training. These goals would, of course, also be modified as the training itself is modified to meet the needs of the particular group of participants. The duration statement is an indication of the minimum time necessary to gain a relevant benefit from the training. In essence, then, these descriptions are a stimulus. A stimulus for groups, teams and organizations to think about training which might meet their needs. As well as those suggestions offered here, it is possible to create education and/or training experiences designed specifically for your organization. 

Areas of training currently available at the moment include:

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A. EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 
WITH YOUTH AND FAMILIES

EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 
WITH YOUTH AND FAMILIES
Using Everyday Life Events to Facilitate Change 

Description

The essence of effective child and youth care practice lies in the ability to use everyday life events, as they are occurring, to help facilitate change for children and youth. It is this focus which distinguishes youth care practice from other forms of helping. This is especially true in group living situations where the worker participates actively in all aspects of a youth's daily living. This training will define and demonstrate this skill and will provide the opportunity for participants to incorporate this approach into their own work with young people. 
Goals Participants will
  • develop an appreciation for the importance of common daily events. 
  • understand the concept and process of using everyday events for helping youth. 
  • develop skills in using everyday live events to facilitate change 
  • identify how their practice might change to incorporate this approach.
Duration 1 day 

EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 
WITH YOUTH AND FAMILIES
Context and Intervention 

Description

The context within which an intervention occurs has a direct bearing on the effectiveness of that intervention. It includes characteristics and elements of the intervenor and the client, the systems of which they are individually or collectively a part, and the immediate environment in which the intervention occurs. Being aware of these elements of context allows the intervenor to structure interventions which incorporate them so that the intervention `fits' for the youth, the worker and particular situation. 
Goals

Participants will

  • develop knowledge of the relevant elements of context.

  • develop a framework for developing contextual interventions. 

  • develop skills for making contextual interventions. 

  • become more effective in their work with youth and families. 

 

Duration 1- 2 days

EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 
WITH YOUTH AND FAMILIES
Meaning and Intervention in Child and Youth Care Practice 

Description

When youth and child and youth care worker meet in the encounter we call 'intervention' both go through a process of making meaning of their experience which influences how they respond to one another. When the worker is aware of how both she and the client create meaning, it becomes more possible to create `meaningful' interventions. When the worker is unable to acknowledge or understand how the client is creating meaning, the intervention frequently does not `make sense' to the client and worker has difficulty in interpreting the clients response to the intervention. This training will elaborate the concept of meaning-making interventions through an exploration of the ways in which this process impacts on the process of intervention. 
Goals Participants will
  • be able to understand the process of meaning making 
  • understand the elements of self which influence their own process of meaning making. 
  • develop skills to help them understand the meaning-making process of clients. 
  • develop strategies for incorporating meaning-making into their work. 
Duration 1-2 days 

EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS 
WITH YOUTH AND FAMILIES
Developing Effective Youth Care Interventions

Description

The effective youth care intervention is distinctly different, in both conceptualization and delivery, from interventions which are not effective. Yet not all youth care interventions are effective. This training will make evident the general elements of an effective youth care intervention and will explore characteristics which seem to be associated with interventions which are effective. Through discussion, exercises and real-world examples, this training will assist the worker in becoming more effective in their work with youth and families. 
Goals Participants will  
  • develop an understanding of characteristics associated with the effective youth care intervention. 
  • study the elements of context, meaning-making, process and relationship associated with effective interventions with youth. 
  • develop a framework for the effective child and youth care intervention. 
  • be able to analyse the effectiveness of their own intervention approach. 
  • develop new strategies and skills in intervening with youth and families. 
Duration 2 - 5 days 



B. FAMILY FOCUSED CHILD 
AND YOUTH CARE PRACTICE 


FAMILY FOCUSED CHILD AND YOUTH CARE PRACTICE  Working With Families in the Community
(in-home encounters) 

Description

More and more youth care workers are being supported in working with families in their home environment. Yet encountering a family in their natural environment is very different than encountering the same family within the confines of a program. This training is designed to help workers understand those differences and develop an orientation and skills for working in their environment. 
Goals Participants will
  • understand the importance of the environment in which family encounters occur. 
  • be aware of some of the common difficulties workers face in making the transition to community work. 
  • develop strategies for positioning themselves in family encounters. 
  • develop skills for intervening with families in the community. 
Duration 2-3 days 

FAMILY FOCUSED CHILD AND YOUTH CARE PRACTICE  Enhancing Family Involvement in Youth Care Programs

Description

The meaningful involvement of family members in youth care programs reduces the sense of isolation and increases the probability of successful outcome. It also makes the youth care program a much more exciting and challanging place for workers. The effective involvement of family members, however, requires both a general philosophy of involvement and an understanding of how, and why, each member should be engaged in the program. During this training, participants will learn about ways in which family involvement in their programs can be developed or enhanced and will explore the meanings of family involvement which exist within families, organizations, and themselves. 
Goals Participants will
  • develop a framework for understanding family involvement. 
  • identify obstacles to family involvement and strategies for dealing with those. 
  • explore options for the enhancement of family involvement in their program. 
  • develop new skills for the involvement of family members. 
  • develop greater confidence in their ability to involve family members effectively. 
Duration 2-3 days 

FAMILY FOCUSED CHILD AND YOUTH CARE PRACTICE  Consumer Feedback 

Description

Paying attention to feedback from youth and families allows us to ensure that our programs and practices are meeting the needs of consumers. Through the use of video clips of consumer's experiences of the care system, participants will be encouraged to reflect critically on some of the most common practices in care-giving. This training will challenge the meaning which we give to some of our practices, through a consideration of alternative meanings as expressed by consumers in the video clips. 
Goals Participants will
  • be challenged to re-consider how they have their current youth care practices framed. 
  • reflect upon their personal philosophies of care-giving. 
  • consider alternative perceptions of common care-giving practices. 
  • be able to articulate alternative meanings for some common youth care practices. 
Duration Half day 

FAMILY FOCUSED CHILD AND YOUTH CARE PRACTICE  Understanding Families: A Systemic Perspective 

Description

In order to be helpful to families, youth care workers must have a way to understand and organize their experience of the families which they encounter in their work. This experiential training will assist workers in developing such an understanding. Through maintaining a central focus on the youth in a family, workers will develop ways of seeing youth which includes the family of which they are a part. The use of a systemic perspective will also make this training a valuable experience for those workers who only encounter families occasionally in their work with young people.
Goals Participants will
  • develop a framework for understanding family structure and dynamics. 
  • develop an appreciation of the position of the youth in the family. 
  • develop different ways of understanding a youth's behaviour. 
Duration 1 day 



C. CHILD AND YOUTH CARE 
SUPERVISION 


CHILD AND YOUTH CARE SUPERVISION SET: A Systemic Framework for Youth Care Supervision 

Description

Effective supervision is one of the most important supports an organization can offer to its workers. The essence of that support involves support, education and training (SET). This presentation will assist supervisors in developing or refining their thinking about supervisory practice. A framework will be presented which will provided supervisors with a way to decide what to do in supervisory interactions with staff. 
Goals Participants will
  • understand the roles of support, education and training in supervision. 
  • make clear distinctions between supervision, management and counselling. 
  • be able to articulate a framework for their supervisory practice. 
Duration Half to full day

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE SUPERVISION Supervision for Therapeutic Youth Care Practice 

Description

As youth care has evolved into a more therapeutic form of helping clinical supervision for child and youth care workers has become a necessity. The youth care supervisor must be able to provide supervision which contributes to the effectiveness of the workers' clinical interventions. This training will attend specifically to supervision for enhanced therapeutic effectiveness in child and youth care practice and will provide an opportunity for educative consultation for child and youth care supervisors. Participants should bring their own issues and concerns regarding supervision, as specific examples raised by the participants will form the core of this training. Issues related to providing clinical supervision, such as an understanding of the effective child and youth care intervention, the role of meaning making, the distinction between management, supervision and therapy, and the utilization of self in therapeutic intervention will be presented by the facilitator as appropriate to the specific examples raised by participants. 
Goals Participants will
  • develop a personal framework for supervision in therapeutic youth care practice.
  • discover solutions to some of their current difficulties of supervision. 
  • develop or enhance their skills in the clinical supervision of youth care workers. 
  • develop greater their ability to provide supervision for therapeutic effectiveness. 
Duration 2 days, presumes that participants have a general framework. 



D. PRACTICE ISSUES IN 
CHILD AND YOUTH CARE
 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE Consumer Feedback for Care-givers

Description

Paying attention to feedback from youth and families allows us to ensure that our programs and practices are meeting the needs of consumers. Through the use of video clips of consumer's experiences of the care system, participants will be encouraged to reflect critically on some of the most common practices in care-giving. This training will challenge the meaning which we give to some of our practices, through a consideration of alternative meanings as expressed by consumers in the video clips.
Goals Participants will
  • be challenged to re-consider how they have their current youth care practices framed. 
  • reflect apon their personal philosophies of care 
  • consider alternative perceptions of common care-giving practices. 
  • be able to articulate some possible alternative meanings for some common child and youth care practices. 
Duration Half day 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE Self-directed Ethical Decision Making 

Description

Is there a difference between ethical practice and good clinical practice? What are the elements of ethical practice and how does the worker, caught in the intense action of helping, process information in a way that allows the worker to make decisions which are ethical? This session will describe and explore a model, developed through work with youth care workers, for ethical decision making in youth care practice. 
Goals Participants will, 

- become aware of their responsibility for resolving ethical dilemmas. 

- develop an approach for resolving these dilemmas. 

- learn a model for ethical decision making 
Duration 1 day 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE Systems in the Milieu 

Description

The milieu within which youth care practice occurs is composed of a multitude of interacting systems, such as that of the youth's family, the school, the youth's peer group, the staff group, the worker's family history, and many more. All of these systems influence each other, the youth, the worker and most importantly, the interactions between the youth and the worker. An awareness of how these systems operate to influence everyone involved allows the worker to be more effective in using these systems for the benefit of the youth. This training will identify and explore the various systems which are present in the milieu and strategies the worker might use to deal with those systems in a manner beneficial to youth and families. 
Goals Participants will, 

- identify the systems which are important in working with youth in care. 

- become aware of how these systems act on people in the milieu. 

- learn how to consider these systems when structuring their interventions. 

- become more conscious of the systems which operate in their own programs. 
Duration 1 day 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE Systems Thinking in Practice 

Description

Learning to think systemically while working with youth in care allows the worker to become more creative in developing interventions for youth and families. It also allows the worker to create interventions which impact on the family as a whole unit. Thinking systemically while in the midst of intervening is, however, difficult. This experiential training will use real practice examples to help the worker develop the skill of thinking while doing. 
Goals Participants will, 

- develop a framework for thinking systemically. 

- develop skills for thinking while involved in the action of intervening. 

- become more systemic in their practice. 
Duration 1 day 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE The Presence, Role, and Use of Self 

Description

The `self' of the worker is always present in work with youth and families. It is present in the values, beliefs and attitudes which the worker brings to their work. It is also present in all the decisions which the worker makes. The presence of self is objectively neither positive or negative. It is how one uses self, and the impact of self on clients, which is of importance. This training will explore the presence and use of self in our work with youth and families. 
Goals Participants will, 

- become aware of the role of self in work with youth and families. 

- become more familiar with the aspects of their own self which have the most impact on their work. 

- become more effective in the use of self in their work with youth and families. 

- understand better their own orientation towards helping. 
Duration 1 day 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE Discipline and Care 

Description

Discipline is action undertaken with the intention of educating. Yet it is often confused by a perceived need for control and authority. Discipline may involve authority and control but it always has an educational function as its central focus. Ensuring that one retains a focus on educating requires that the worker has a way of understanding the youth and the youth's behaviour while intervening. This training will emphasize the need for all disciplinary actions to be taken in the context of the individual youth's needs. 
Goals Participants will, 

- learn the distinction between discipline and control. 

- develop approaches to discipline which maintain a focus on education. 
Duration Half day 

PRACTICE ISSUES IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE Developing Individualized Intervention Plans

Description

The individualized intervention plan provides us with the framework for our daily interactions with youth and their families as well as an overall direction for our work with them. This plan not only identifies needs, goals, strategies and indicators, but may also form a therapeutic contract between workers, youth and family which includes the responsibilities of each in the process of change. The individualized plan also connects the youth and family's past experiences to the present and sets the stage for their future. This session will identify the elements of both content and process associated with developing an individualized intervention plan with youth and families. 
Goals Participants will, 

- learn a framework for the individual intervention plan. 

- develop skills in articulating an individual plan. 
Duration 1 day 

 



E. ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES

ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES Developing Staff Training Programs 

Description

Developing successful training programs for staff involves attending to the current practice reality of the participants. It also requires that there is a match between the actions of the trainer and the actions expected of the participants in their work. Effective training programs thus link directly to the needs and expectations of participants. This session will identify the necessary components of effective training programs for staff. 
Goals Participants will
  • learn about the elements of effective staff training programs. 
  • begin to develop a framework for staff training for one component of their organization. 
Duration Half day 

ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES Training for Trainers: Fundamentals, Strategies and Techniques 

Description

The development and delivery of effective training programs requires knowing about adult learning, an understanding of group process and an awareness of personal style, as well as a knowledge of content, teaching methods and strategies for promoting learning. It also requires that the trainer be sensitive to and be able to utilize context; be able to translate theory into practive; know how to deal with difficult situations; and understand the difference between education and training. And much, much more. This experiential training will model the elements of effective training while teaching fundamentals, strategies and techniques important for the trainer. 
Goals Participants will
  • increase their knowledge of the elements of effective training. 
  • become more aware of their own preferred style and how that may enhance or detract from participants experience of the training. 
  • learn approaches to dealing with some of the common difficulties of in training. 
  • develop more skills in delivering effective training experiences for others. 
Duration 2 days 

ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES Developing A New Program 

Description

Developing a new program requires a consideration of numerous elements and a process which ensures the integration of the new service in to the total organization. The program developer must also utilize a process which ensures that the staff developing the program are involved in a manner which encourages ownership of the program. This presentation will provide a framework for program development which meets these criteria. 
Goals Participants will
  • learn a framework for effective new program development 
  • refine their own ability to guide new program development. 
Duration Half day 

ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES Group Living: Philosophy, Structure, Program, & Care 

Description

A group living environment is a complex system organized around a central philosophy of care-giving and treatment. It is this central philosophy which serves as a base for all the other elements of a program. These other elements must be integrated in to a well defined whole in order for the experience of the program to be most effective for youth and families. The role of staff in developing and maintaining this is essential. 
Goals Participants will
  • learn the elements of an effective group living program. 
  • learn about the process of effective group living. 
  • develop a model for group living which reflects their own philosophy. 
  • outline a plan for enhancing their own group living program. 
Duration Introduction: half day 
Training: 2 days 


F. Other Possibilities 
to Stimulate Your Thinking

  • Assertiveness Training 

  • Attachment Behaviors in Youth Care 

  • Becoming a Family Focused Youth Care Agency 

  • Building on Client Strengths 

  • Content and Process in Caring for Troubled Youth 

  • Creativity in Intervening with Youth and Families 

  • Empowering Youth and Families 

  • Engaging and Encountering Young People Where They're At 

  • Helping Staff to Accept New Ways of Working with Youth 

  • Hiring Competent Youth Care Workers 

  • Isolation and Intervention: Some guidelines for the room, the cell, the group

  • Management for Residential Care Supervisors 

  • Night Supervision in Residential Programs: Guidelines and Practice 

  • Philosophy of Treatment and Care: Developing and Articulating 

  • Privacy and Personal Space in Group Living 

  • Program Review: Developing an Individualized System 

  • Role of Staff Values, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Preventing Institutional Abuse 

  • Sculpting in Working with Families 

  • Standards for Group Care: Developing and Implementing 

  • The Use of Action and Space in Family Work 

  • Transitional Care for Youth Moving to Independent Living

Each organization has its own unique needs
for training and development. All training courses
need to be tailor-made. If you have questions of
ideas for your team, feel free to raise them ...

E-MAIL YOUR ENQUIRY